The Electric Commentary

Friday, August 26, 2005

I guess I'm addicted to being pasty-white.

The newest addiction wreaking havoc on the nation is:

Anywhere from one-quarter to one-half of people catching rays at the beach may actually be addicted to tanning, according to new study findings.

After interviewing 145 beachgoers, U.S. researchers found that a significant portion met a series of addiction criteria traditionally used to diagnose alcoholism and other substance use disorders.

These findings suggest that regular sun-tanners may have a new type of substance disorder involving ultraviolet light, write the authors, led by Dr. Richard F. Wagner, Jr., of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston.
(Hat tip, Nick Gillespie)

10 Comments:

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    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 4:14 PM  

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    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 4:55 PM  

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    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 5:01 PM  

  • It was only a matter of time. It looks like the PC overextention of "addiction" and "disease" has continued to sprawl. Except for the part about preferring it to all other activities, by the 2nd set of criteria I am addicted to law school, ultimate frisbee, and perhaps naps.

    I hate crappy studies and this almost certainly is one. Crappy studies fail to account for alternative hypotheses, such as these people make rational decisions to tan based on a higher than average valuation of physical appearance (perhaps combined with a penchant for sedimentary activities.)

    The study's author, Dr. Wagner, is a dermatologist, not a psychologist or psychiatrist and probably has little more professional expertise in human behavior or sound survey methodology than the average college graduate. Sounds like he is trying to generate publicity so he can get more grant money.

    By Anonymous Scott H, at 3:57 PM  

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